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New Visual Book Crush X-Ray

Exploring inner beauty with “X-Ray”

22 Feb
2018

Posted in Graphic Specialities

Have you ever dreamt of being able to see through the surface of things?

In the new Crush visual book “X-Ray” we explore the inner beauty of its ingredients thanks to the incredible X-ray images of English photographer Nick Veasey.

A first impression of something rarely reveals what is beneath its surface. That is why photographer Nick Veasey likes to challenge the assumptions we make based on the outward physical appearance of an object. He does this by using delicate x-ray techniques to photograph his subjects, stripping back the layers revealing what is underneath.

Beyond the surface: veins of the leaves, olive pits and pulp in the photo of Nick Veasey printed on Crush Kiwi and Olive.

Beyond the surface: veins of the leaves, olive pits and pulp in the photo of Nick Veasey printed on Crush Kiwi and Olive.

Veasey has uses this technique to help present Crush – a range of Favini papers – exposing the inner beauty of its ingredients. The eco-friendly papers are made using the process residues of crushed citrus fruits, grapes, cherries, lavender, corn, olives, coffee, kiwi fruits, almonds, and hazelnuts and this replaces 15% of virgin tree pulp.

The symbol of radioactivity

When leafing through the visual book we immediately see the danger symbol of radiation that indicates we will start to encounter the imagery of “X-Ray”.

As it is known today, the symbol of radioactivity is a trefoil consisting of three blades radiating from a central point.

 The yellow-coloured trefoil, symbol of the "danger of radiation", printed on Crush Citrus

The yellow-coloured trefoil, symbol of the “danger of radiation”, printed on Crush Citrus

Originally and rather surprisingly, the symbol was not black and yellow, the colours that are so familiar today, but magenta on a blue background. [1]

At the time of the logo creation, the choice of colours was more controversial than the symbol itself, which was invented at the “Radiation Laboratory” of the “University of California” in 1946.

The tale of how it was invented is told in a letter by Nels Garden, Head of the “Health Chemistry Group”: “A number of people in the group was interested in suggesting different designs, and the only suggestion that turned out to be interesting was a design that represented the radiation emitted by an atom”. [2]

Nick Veasey: an X-ray photographer!

English photographer Nick Veasey has developed a particular photographic technique using X-rays to show the inner beauty of things.

From bikes to airplanes, from animals to flowers, everyday objects are transformed with X-ray photography where the layers of the subjects are shown in singular detail.

Nick Veasey in the laboratory

Nick Veasey in the laboratory

His works are exhibited in scientific institutions and art galleries, such as the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. His intriguing photographs have collected numerous international awards.

Nick Veasey has enjoyed numerous collaborations within advertising that have given life to projects of great impact.

 “My aim is to make people reconsider the inherent beauty in what surrounds us” Nick Veasey

According to the photographer we live in a world obsessed with images, we see only the outward appearance of things and the first impression rarely reveals what is hidden under the surface of an object.

All this motivates Nick Veasey who loves to challenge all the hypotheses already made on the physical appearance of a subject by photographing it with “X-ray” techniques, penetrating the layers and reveal what really lurks beneath the surface.

Veasey’s instruments: chemicals and X-ray machine

Veasey’s instruments: chemicals and X-ray machine

Exploring the inner beauty of Crush

We asked Veasey to use this technique to help reveal the inner beauty of Crush’s ingredients, the ecological paper produced using agro-industrial residues of citrus, grapes, cherries, lavender, corn, olives, coffee, kiwi, hazelnuts and almonds.

Preparation of the ingredients for X-ray pictures

Preparation of the ingredients for X-ray pictures

Thanks to Veasey’s photos we can see beyond the surface of corn, olive branches, bunches of grapes, nuts kernels, orange peel and many other elements. The images reveal fascinating details: the veins of the leaves, the presence of seeds and pits, delicacy of lavender flowers and geometry of a lemon.

Corn, kiwi, lemon, orange peel: the ingredients of Crush photographed on X-rays

Corn, kiwi, lemon, orange peel: the ingredients of Crush photographed on X-rays

To obtain the ecological paper Crush, up to 15% of by-products from the agro-industrial sector are used in substitution of wood fibre.

Also the more conventional raw material for paper was photographed by Nick Veasey: in this picture we see an X-ray, printed on Crush Almond and Crush Hazelnut, of a tree trunk from which we obtain the virgin cellulose for paper production.

News VB Crush X-Ray -Foto sezione tronco

An insight on Crush and its visual books

Crush is an eco-friendly range of papers by Favini, made by replacing up to 15% of virgin tree pulp with process residue from organic products.

We chose a mix of fruit and nuts to create a new range of natural coloured papers: the residue of citrus, grapes, cherry, lavender, corn, olive, coffee, kiwi, hazelnut and almond are the natural raw materials that help to give a new life to products, these would normally be added to animal food and fertilisers, or simply dumped in landfill.

Crush’s previous visual book “Fruits & Nuts” was just about fruits and nuts!

Orange cycle: from citrus fruit for the production of fruit juices to Crush paper obtained with orange residues.

Orange cycle: from citrus fruit for the production of fruit juices to Crush paper obtained with orange residues.

Amongst the images taken by photographer Bruce Head in the previous visual book, we can find the explanatory diagram of the life cycle of oranges: From the original citrus fruit to produce fruit juices, then used through numerous processes for the extraction of essences, biofuels, pectin, we finally obtain a depectinized residue.

It is at this point that Favini intervenes, using the depectinized residue, a material of little interest and value, revaluing it and elevating it to a worthwhile raw material for the production of high quality ecological papers.

Crush contains 40% post-consumer recycled, is FSC® certified and produced using EKOenergy without GMO. Using the agro-industrial residues and EKOenergy, the carbon footprint is reduced by 20% and the production of CO2 for this paper is totally offset by the purchase of carbon credits.

To discover all the Favini’s green activities, visit the new the dedicated area full of information about our commitment to the environment: Sustainability Channel.

It’s now time to turn off lights and machinery and as the new visual “X-Ray” suggests, start to go beyond appearances to see the inner beauty of things!

x-ray off

 

[1] Fonte http://www.mub.eps.manchester.ac.uk/nuclearhitchhiker/?p=665

[2] Fonte: http://www.zonanucleare.com/complementi/simbolo_radioattivita.htm

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